First Person Point of View

It has been requested of me to talk about imagining in the first person. The importance of imagining from your own perspective lies in different areas.

Through my studies, I heard coaches say that your manifestation cannot come to pass unless you imagine in the first person. Although I do agree to some extent, I would like to cover some other reasons for why imagining from your own perspective is important.

You will find it easier to get lost in the imaginal act.

Many people find it easier to evoke emotions if they are imagining from the first person perspective. It is much easier to evoke emotion when you see things as they are happening to you. Imagine seeing yourself kissing your specific person. Then, imagine kissing your specific person from your point of view. When you are imagining from your point of view, you can also feel it. You are able to smell your SP’s perfume. You are able to touch them. It is much easier to actually get lost in your imaginal act that way, isn’t it? Taking a picture of two people kissing isn’t the same as you actually kissing somebody, is it?

Your imaginal act will be more believable.

You may also find it easier to actually believe in the reality of your imaginal act if you are imagining from the first person point of view. Remember, the only person that needs to believe in the reality of your imaginal act is you, yourself. Your imaginal act can feel as real as something that is happening in your physical world around you if you really immerse yourself into it. To understand the difference, compare it to the movie. Watching the rain fall on TV may evoke some emotions but it doesn’t feel the same as feeling the rain on your skin.

You activate more senses when you are imagining from the first person point of view.

As you may have noticed in the previous two explanations, when you are imagining from the first person point of view, you are engaging more senses. This goes hand-in-hand with what Neville Goddard suggests: engage as many of your senses as possible. When you are imagining from the first person point of view, it is very easy to engage the sense of touch. When it comes to the sense of sight, imagining something from your own point of view sends the signal to your subconscious mind that you want to explore this experience yourself, you, personally, and not only watch it happen.

How to imagine from the first person point of view?

Imagining from the first person point of view is actually very easy. It means you are literally looking through your own eyes during the imaginal act. You are not seeing yourself as something separate from you. Everything that is happening in your imaginal act, is happening to you. One technique many people use is to look at your hands when you start your imaginal scene. Close your eyes and imagine looking down at your hands. Another good technique that even Neville used is to sit down in one room and imagine you are actually sitting in some other room of your home. Remember, you are imagining from your point of view. What would you see if you were sitting on the couch in this other room? How different would sitting on the couch in that other room feel from sitting on the couch in this room? It doesn’t matter if it doesn’t work out perfectly the first few times.

I am

The last thing I would like to talk about is your I Amness. Seeing God as something outside of you means looking at it as something separate from you. Yet, we know that is not true. We know we are Gods of our own realities, we control our own experiences. We are one with God and so we have to be one with the thing we wish to experience. God is not “there”. God is here.

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